Skip to content Skip to navigation
See our Campus Ready site for the most up to date information about instruction.Campus ReadyCOVID Help

Monday 02/22

Hate Speech and Free Speech

VIDEO RECORDING

 

DESCRIPTION:

From white nationalist demonstrations to viral memes, from political misinformation to online trolls, hate speech is everywhere. In the United States, the First Amendment right of free speech protects most hate speech. Join this workshop to discuss the tension between free speech and hate speech on college campuses and online. Can we respond in ways that address the harms of hate speech while protecting free speech rights?

Speaker: Dr. Jennifer Lambe,  Associate Professor, Department of Communication, University of Delaware2020-2021 Fellow of the University of California Center for Free Speech and Civic Engagement

Jennifer Lambeis an associate professor in the Communication Department at the University of Delaware, with a joint appointment in the Legal Studies minor and the Center for Political Communication. Lambe is a 2020-2021 Fellow with    The University of California NationalCenter on Free Speech and Civic Engagement. Lambe received her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 2000.

Her research and teaching focus broadly on media and democracy. Her areas of interest include (a) freedom of expression; (b) media policy/law/ethics; and (c) the effects of media. In 2017 she co-authored the second edition of Media Effects and Society with Elizabeth M. Perse. Other current and recent projects include a forthcoming book,   tentatively titled Remedies for Hate Speech, improved measurement of public (and campus) willingness to censor,   updating measurement of political tolerance, public opinion about celebrity and athlete free speech, net neutrality, and campaign finance issues.

Lambe has been partnering with the Vice Provost for Diversity at the University of Delaware for five years to provide campus programming about the tensions between free speech and hate speech. Their largest collaboration was a two-day symposium entitled “Speech Limits in Public Life: At the Intersection of FreeSpeech and Hate.”